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K.) Pockets, from the perception that members of the German Army often walk around with their hands in them (prohibited in most NATO armed services - including the Bundeswehr. Air Force) Term used to refer to the two-striped chevron of Airman First Class, usually awarded to a six-year enlistee immediately after his technical school or to a four-year enlistee after 10 months in the rank of Airman (also see "dragonfly wings").(Canada) Confirmation of Combat Knowledge, a play-on from the more acceptable vernacular - AAR (After action review). Not to be confused with the all-metal "Food Container, Insulated" or "FCI" which is commonly called a "mermite can."(U. Army, and a familiar term for Chief Master Sergeant, the highest enlisted rank in the U. In this position, the man is often casually referred to passively and in-person as "COB".(Australia) An Army Reservist.

The name refers to the act of dragging every thing out of ones bag while in formation(U.

S.) The name given to the fast food options in chow halls, i.e.; hot dogs and hamburgers. In the Air Force, commonly a reference to pre-packed Flight Lunches intended for aircrew or personnel whose duties do not allow them to go to the chow hall to eat their meals. S.) Highly derogatory, typically used to describe a Soldier whose uniform wear is unsatisfactory, as in "Private Smith, you look like a bag of smashed asshole".

A newly-commissioned (O-1) graduate of Officer Candidate School or DIRCOM (Direct Commissioning) program.

Also, "Auto-pilot march."To inspect gear/personal bags for unauthorized equipment or prohibited items either prior to posting for shift or upon return from overseas deployment.

used mostly about the disgust at the distance or remoteness, but also implies that there could be little worthwhile in such an isolated place. This name is usually used to further emphasize an uncomfortable situation, as in "I've got a three-hour date (12 mile road march at min/mile) with the big green tick."(U. In air exercises, it is common to "spike" or lock onto a friendly without engaging.

The variants "Big Fucking Empty", "BFN" or "Bum Fuck Nowhere" are used in the same sense.(U. S., Canada) A form of hazing meted out to unpopular service members. When the Air Force became independent, black shoes replaced the brown shoes worn by the Army at that time.1. This causes the targeted aircraft's defense systems to warn of active targeting.

Generally the individuals who make up these companies will leave boot camp in top physical shape, because they are always being punished with physical training, also known as "cycling".(U.

S.) The nickname given to the powdered drink served with MRE's on onboard ships.

For the purposes of this article, "military slang" includes slang used by any English-speaking armed forces (armies, navies, air forces). "Airman Dummy is ate-up with the dumbass." In some U. Normally done during training to avoid an obstacle, such as a tree or MTI.

During WWII, Korea, and early Vietnam, prior to 1970, this terminology referred only to graduates of OCS, which was also derisively known as the "Oklahoma Cook's School." From 2004-2005, the U. Marine Corps had a 90 day reservist option that allowed a Marine to enlist, do boot camp, then return to civilian life without attending advanced schooling to finish high school.(U. Navy) Term used to designate something as "All hands", or pertinent to everyone.

Involves covering the head and arms of the target with a blanket to prevent fighting back or identification of the attackers while a beating is administered.(U. Air Force) An enlisted aircrew member serving on either a KC-135 'Stratotanker' or KC-10 'Extender' primarily responsible for refueling other aircraft in flight. Air Force, where it was slang for a fatal crash, wherein the "farm" referred to the small plot of land at the cemetery where the individual was laid to rest, then generally any KIA G. whose insurance money pays the family funeral bills.(U. Air Force) Things and people related to the time when the Air Corps was a subsidiary unit of the U. (US) A metaphorical scatological reference describing a panicked reaction. "Buddy Spike" is a term used to reassure the "spiked" aircraft that the lock came from a friendly aircraft.